South Georgia peanut crop threatened by record heat - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

South Georgia peanut crop threatened by record heat

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August 17, 2007

Lee County  -- Like most South Georgians, peanut farmers are watching the thermometer. This record heat wave could be baking their crop in the ground.

 The lack of rain so far in August, and the brutally hot temperatures are bad for developing peanuts. This is a critical time for the crops' growth, and they need moisture now.

 Ag experts say it is almost impossible to put enough water into the ground to offset the temperatures. Lee County Farm Services Director Hank Hammond said "it will prevent that little peanut from forming, and that peg that goes down into the ground. So these hot temperatures, they do have a good potential for cutting back yields."

Many South Georgia farmers planted their peanuts late this year because of the drought, and don't expect to harvest until late September or October.

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