Rabies exposure possible this summer - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Rabies exposure possible this summer

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Major road project takes a step forward

    Major road project takes a step forward

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 12:02 AM EDT2014-04-23 04:02:45 GMT
    Lee County Commissioners are close to approving a route for a major road project that will connect the east and west parts of the county. Tuesday night, they heard from Georgia Tech engineers who studiedMore >>
    Lee County residents will soon have the chance to give their opinions on a major road project.More >>
  • City leaders approve new rules for model airplanes

    City leaders approve new rules for model airplanes

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:59 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:59:14 GMT
    Albany city commissioners approve new rules for model airplanes.      Following complaints from some people who live near Hilsman Park a citizen's advisory committee spent months studying the issue andMore >>
    Albany city commissioners approve new rules for model airplanes.      Following complaints from some people who live near Hilsman Park a citizen's advisory committee spent months studying the issue andMore >>
  • Voters hear from candidates at forum

    Voters hear from candidates at forum

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:56 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:56:54 GMT
    Voters heard from more than a dozen political candidates at a forum Tuesday night hosted by the Albany Civil Rights Institute. People running in Dougherty County Commission, Dougherty County School BoardMore >>
    Days before early voting opens, candidates for several races in Dougherty County get together to try earn voters' support.More >>

July 17, 2007

Albany -- Public health workers want to make sure you're not putting yourself at risk for rabies, especially since it's summer and you many spend more time outdoors.

Rabies can be deadly and it's easily contracted from stray and wild animals that have not been vaccinated. This year, there have been already at least three confirmed rabies cases in animals in Southwest Georgia.

Public health workers say if you see an animal acting strangely, it could be a sign it is infected.

"You notice any wild animals that's acting suspicious. Something that's not domesticated, if its acting domesticated, that's a trigger for you to know that's an animal you need to stay away from and sometime people will go up and pet those kind of animals or try to feed and that's exactly what you don't want to do," says Dr. Jacqueline Grant.

The health department has a nurse and environmentalist on call 24 hours a day to investigate animal bites and possible rabies exposures.

Health workers say you need to teach your children not to touch or feed stray animals and you should seek emergency treatment if you're attacked by a wild or stray animal.

Feedback: news@walb.com?subject=rabies/bs

Powered by WorldNow