Levee would be cost prohibitive - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Levee would be cost prohibitive

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March 7, 2007

Albany - A long-debated levee system to try to prevent future flooding in Albany apparently would just be too expensive to build. A study by the Army Corps of Engineers showed that building a new levee would be cost prohibitive.

The study also concluded that other options, like excavating the river, wouldn't make a big impact. If city officials could somehow convince Congress to pay for safeguards, it could cost the federal government up to $36 Million.

"It seems like bad news. I don't know that anyone is giving up yet. Other avenues to explore, other options to look at," says Roger Burke with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Dr. Charles Gillespie said, "With the chambers' support we can turn it around and get something done even if it's deepening of the river or the levy they spoke about. The cost factor's are enormous but the fact is human life and property are worth it, as far as I am concerned."

Another study is currently being conducted by the city and county through a partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey. That study may show other alternatives that would be less costly and provide more protection against flooding.

comments: news@walb.com?subject=CorpsOfEngineersStudy

 

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