What's the future of Albany's Bio-solids? - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

What's the future of Albany's Bio-solids?

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February 13, 2007

Albany --  The city of Albany has residual fertilizer from their waste treatment process they are offering free to South Georgia farmers, but it is a controversial subject. Bio-solid residual waste is produced by the process of treatment at their South Albany water plant.

Right now City of Albany officials are meeting with Lee County farmers, offering the bio-solids to them free. Currently Albany trucks 3,000 tons of the waste to Alabama, where it is spread on farms there for fertilizer.

Albany officials think South Georgia farmers could take advantage of the waste, but they know many people are afraid it will pollute the ground water.  

"We only put down enough in what we call agronomic rates, so it will only be enough so the plants can take it up, and it won't pollute the ground water," said Albany Public Works Director Phil Roberson. "So one of the things we are trying to do is to answer the citizen's concerns they may have."  

Roberson says the E.P.D. Closely monitors the application of the bio-solids, to protect the environment. Albany officials are meeting with Lee County people right now at their county commission meeting.

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