Farmers fear worst from farm bill - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Farmers fear worst from farm bill

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February 2, 2007

Leesburg - - A proposal to tighten the federal budget could have a drastic effect on South Georgia farmers.

President Bush proposes reducing farm payments by 18 billion dollars over the next five years. The proposal would eliminate farm payments for wealthy producers and limit subsidies to those who make less than $200,000.

As Congress writes a new farm bill this year, even less money is anticipated for farm programs.  

"Farmers don't want to see the payments reduced anymore. Several years ago our peanut program that we depended on so much was drastically changed and that hurt farmers significantly. This year were looking at good grain priced which would be a good benefit but we'd still like some good support prices," says Doug Collins of the Lee County Extension Service.

The farm bill gives farmers money and other resources to supplement their income. It helps offset crop prices and helps them manage their supplies.

The current farm bill was written in 2002. It expires at the end of the year.

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