Looking out for Georgia's money - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Looking out for Georgia's money

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September 24, 2006

Albany - - An Atlanta-based non-profit group is serving as a watch-dog to make sure state leaders make good use of Georgia tax payers' money.

 Alan Essig is the director of the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute.

The group researches and educates people on the fiscal and economic health of the state of Georgia. Essig met with Albany leaders today raising questions to get people thinking.  

"Is revenue keeping up with the growth of the state. Even if revenues grow 6, 7, or 8 percent because Georgia is the fifth fastest growing state in the country, the elderly population is going to double in size over the next 20 years, the transportation needs, education, healthcare, just normal growth. Is the revenue base big enough to support what the state needs to do," Essig asks.

His group seeks to update the state's tax structure and generate more revenue without raising taxes.

Essig will speak on a panel tomorrow sponsored by Parent Connection which provides policymakers with current data needed to make decisions about priorities, services, and resources impacting Georgia's youth.