Tifton men hope to change the face of alternative fuel - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Tifton men hope to change the face of alternative fuel

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July 31, 2006

Tifton-- A couple of South Georgia men hope to use an international company to bring alternative fuel technology to economically distressed counties.  

Brett Wetherington and Albert Coburn began a company called Brettech Alternative Fuels, Inc. They signed a deal with a Portugese company to use their technology in the United States. The system will separate sugar from crops such as beets and sweet potatoes to make ethanol.

Their plan is to build ten plants around south Georgia that would provide up to 40 jobs each.  

"We'll be bringing 30 to 40 jobs to each of these towns directly. Our whole emphasis is on community," says Wetherington.

"These things will have no adverse impact on environment. We're looking at the most 100,000 gallons a month water usage," says Coburn.  

The men hope to get state and federal grants to pay for the plants. They say each one would cost about 12-million dollars to build. They hope to start construction on the first one in Brooks County within the next year.

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