Tuesday voting will be quicker - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Tuesday voting will be quicker

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July 14, 2006

Tuesday's primary elections will be the first statewide to use electronic poll books, a computerized check-in system to replace the paper lists of voters that poll workers have used in the past.  

Georgia voting officials say the electronic devices to verify voter registrations should lead to shorter lines at the polls on Election Day.  

The devices will allow poll workers to instantly verify that voters are registered and at the correct polling place and will immediately print out their ballot. 

In the past, poll workers had to search for the correct ballot for each voter and crosscheck the voter's address for various state, local and congressional districts.  

The hope is that the new devices will eliminate or at least reduce the long lines that some voters confronted in the 2004 general elections when a record three million people turned out at the polls in Georgia.  

At least two of the new devices will be at every precinct that has more than 250 registered voters, and one machine at each smaller site.