Irrigation technology keeps crops cool - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Irrigation technology keeps crops cool

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July 11, 2006

Moultrie-  Keeping crops properly irrigated has gone high tech.  The National Peanut Research Laboratory is in the second year of research to determine if monitoring soil moisture can improve crops.  The system was designed to manage peanut irrigation.  Now, soil moisture sensors can also help corn and cotton crops. 

"We put these in the soil at 8, 16, and 24 inch depths and we monitor them throughout the growing season so that we can look at, according to what stage of development, the crop is at we can look at the actual soil moisture level and make sure we're getting enough water," said Staci Ingram, Lab Technician. 

The system monitors the crop's development and sensors determine just how much water the plants will need to produce the best yield.

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