Mayor backs property cleanup - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Mayor backs property cleanup

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July 3, 2006

Albany  --  The Mayor of Albany defends the City's decision to use sales tax money to clean up contaminated city property.  

Dr. Willie Adams apologized Monday for what he called a mistake by the prior administration. Lead contamination was found on the Broad Avenue property where a radiator shop once stood.

The city took control of the property in 2002, knowing it might be contaminated. Now the EPD has ordered the city to clean it up by February, which will cost $750,000. The Mayor said he and three other commissioners weren't in office when the city took over the land. But three current commissioners were.

Adams said using sales tax money earmarked for Riverfront park improvements to clean up the site is the best option. "We have to take it from the SPLOST Five project. This is where the development has taken place and legally, that's where we can get the money. Of course, it may mean we will have to down size some of the activities that we had planned in that area. Unless at the end of this SPLOST, we collect more money than we anticipated. Then we can replace the projects back in that area," said Adams.  

Adams says the only other option would be to pay for the clean up with money from the city's reserve fund.

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