Poison Ivy becoming more venomous? - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Poison Ivy becoming more venomous?

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May 30, 2006

Cairo-  A poisonous plant could be growing in strength right here in south Georgia. Poison Ivy can be found in wooded areas across south Georgia, but now it could give you a more severe rash.

A recent study in North Carolina found increased levels of carbon dioxide could be fueling the plant to grow twice as fast making you more likely to break out.

"The study also indicated that the toxicity of the poison ivy also increased under CO2 levels," said Tim Flanders, Grady Co. Extension Coordinator.

Poison Ivy causes an estimated 350,000 cases of skin rashes each year in the United States.