A tax break of a different kind - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

A tax break of a different kind

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Kutcher's peanut ponder picture makes London news

    Kutcher's peanut ponder picture makes London news

    Thursday, April 17 2014 12:17 PM EDT2014-04-17 16:17:49 GMT
    Ashton Kutcher, one of the world's top TV stars, stopped to ponder Georgia's official Peanut Statue in Ashburn. His selfie, showing himself and his fiancé, Mila Kunis, appreciating the structure, hasMore >>
    Ashton Kutcher, one of the world's top TV stars, stopped to ponder Georgia's official Peanut Statue in Ashburn. His selfie, showing himself and his fiancé, Mila Kunis, appreciating the structure, has circled the globe.More >>
  • Supreme Court to hear Cuthbert insurance case

    Supreme Court to hear Cuthbert insurance case

    Thursday, April 17 2014 10:15 AM EDT2014-04-17 14:15:49 GMT
    The Georgia Supreme Court announced that it will hear the case of BARZEY V. CITY OF CUTHBERT (S14A0620)  next week. A woman whose adult son was killed while working for the City of Cuthbert is appealingMore >>
    A woman whose adult son was killed while working for the City of Cuthbert is appealing a Randolph County court ruling that she is not entitled to her son's death benefit, even though she is his only legal heir.More >>
  • Today's the day for News on the Road!

    WALB anniversary tour starts Thursday

    Thursday, April 17 2014 9:04 AM EDT2014-04-17 13:04:46 GMT
    WALB News 10 is hitting the road for our 60th anniversary. You might remember this photo from 2004. Yolanda, Dawn, and Ben having fun with the Ladies of the Red Hat Society in Tifton for WALB's 50thMore >>
    WALB News 10 is hitting the road for our 60th anniversary. You might remember this photo from 2004. Yolanda, Dawn, and Ben having fun with the Ladies of the Red Hat Society in Tifton.More >>

May 26, 2006

WASHINGTON  - The Treasury Department says it will no longer collect some telephone taxes on long-distance calls.  And it's going to refund about $13 billion to consumers.

The tax dates back to 1898.  At the time, telephones were more a luxury than a necessity, and lawmakers were seeking ways to raise
money to fight the Spanish-American War.

Companies have been fighting the tax in court and winning, arguing that the three percent excise tax should not apply to some long-distance calls.

People will be allowed to claim three years' worth of refunds on their 2006 tax returns, filed in 2007.  The federal excise tax on local telephone service remains in effect.

Powered by WorldNow