Public high schools may soon teach Bible courses - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Public high schools may soon teach Bible courses

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March 20, 2006

Albany--Georgia public school students may soon be able to study the Bible in class. Today, the House passed a bill that would allow Bible classes, not as religious instruction, but to focus on law, morals, and cultures from biblical times.

When Courtney Eaddy isn't singing the Word, she's reading and studying it. "I enjoy taking Bible classes," she says.

And hopes she can soon do it inside the classroom with fellow classmates.

"I would like taking it with some of my peers," says Eaddy. She says Bible courses are a way for students to build character. "If you take the class you can use it as life lessons, and put it in your own perspective," says Eaddy.

She believes public schools that offer Bible courses, would help improve student behavior.

"They will act better, and try to respect the teachers more and work and not disrupt the class," says Eaddy.

"It is full of stories that can be used to teach life principles, to teach about faithfulness, to teach about honesty," says Pastor Daniel Simmons.

Simmons isn't surprised that religion is gradually seeping back into public schools. "Right now, Christians are a very strong voting block, so politicians are concerned about that," he says.

Under the bill, The Old and New Testaments would be taught as electives only. "Persons who don't want to take it don't have to, and it's not like you are forcing religion, or forcing the Bible on anybody," he says.

But he says students who choose to take it, would become better people. "Just hearing it, just learning will do something to those young folk," she says.

As for Courtney, even if the Bible isn't taught in the classroom, she plans to continue singing it and reading it no matter what.

The bill that lets bible classes be taught in public high schools already easily passed the Senate.

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