Rain hurts hay farmers' yields - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Rain hurts hay farmers' yields

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Lee sheriff accepts ALS ice challenge

    Lee sheriff accepts ALS ice challenge

    Thursday, August 21 2014 6:21 PM EDT2014-08-21 22:21:00 GMT
    The Lee County Sheriff Reggie Rachals and his wife accepted the ICE challenge Thursday afternoon to support the ALS. More >>
    The Lee County Sheriff Reggie Rachals and his wife accepted the ICE challenge Thursday afternoon to support the ALS. More >>
  • Burglar makes himself at home

    Burglar makes himself at home

    Thursday, August 21 2014 6:06 PM EDT2014-08-21 22:06:30 GMT
    A burglar makes himself at home after breaking into two Colquitt County homes, and he finally got caught. Both times, deputies saw the burglar at the crime scenes. More >>
    A burglar makes himself at home after breaking into two Colquitt County homes, and he finally got caught. Both times, deputies saw the burglar at the crime scenes. More >>
  • Public Safety Captain injured in fire

    Public Safety Captain injured in fire

    Thursday, August 21 2014 5:13 PM EDT2014-08-21 21:13:00 GMT
    A Bainbridge Public Safety Captain was seriously injured while fighting a fire on East Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.More >>
    A Bainbridge Public Safety Captain was seriously injured while fighting a fire on East Martin Luther King Jr. Drive.More >>

August 17, 2005

Lowndes County - Jesse Parker is scrambling to cut all the hay he can while it's still dry. "You need five days to a week stretch of good, hot dry weather," said Parker.

But instead, he's seen two weeks of afternoon thunderstorms. Not only has the rain kept him out of the fields, its also caused disease in the hay. "This field here has got rust and leaf spot in it," said Parker.

Parker's hay would ideally look fluffy and bright green, but instead, most of it is brown, dry, and tainted with rot. "Its caused from too much rain and too much humidity," said Parker.

Now all 50 acres of his field are a total loss. "I was sick, just sick, this is the biggest field that I have," said Parker.

Parker's barn is usually overflowing with hay this time of year, but because of all the rain we've seen lately, its less than half full. "You just try to hit it in between and sometimes you get it up, sometimes you don't," said Parker.

Parker says he'll only make about half of a crop this year and what hay he has been able to salvage isn't the best quality. That could cost him thousands of dollars. "I'll probably be looking at $30,000 to $40,000," said Parker.

But that's the gamble he takes as a farmer, and hopefully, he'll have better luck next year.

feedback: news@walb.com