Blueberry crop looks promising - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Blueberry crop looks promising

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  • Worth Co. hosts open house

    Worth Co. hosts open house

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:24 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:24:37 GMT
    It's already back to school time for some south Georgia students. Classes start tomorrow in Worth County.On Monday afternoon, all the schools held open houses for parents and students.At Worth County elementary, families got to met the teachers and get acquainted with the school.The Principal says the staff is ready, and parents told us they appreciated the open house."We are just going to keep going strong with things that we have done in the past, we had a very successful school year last y...More >>
    It's already back to school time for some south Georgia students. Classes start tomorrow in Worth County.On Monday afternoon, all the schools held open houses for parents and students.At Worth County elementary, families got to met the teachers and get acquainted with the school.The Principal says the staff is ready, and parents told us they appreciated the open house."We are just going to keep going strong with things that we have done in the past, we had a very successful school year last y...More >>
  • Lee Co. Woman speaks out about scary home invasion

    Lee Co. Woman speaks out about scary home invasion

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:20 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:20:11 GMT
    A Lee County woman says she'll think twice before opening her front door after a frightening home invasion.Tonya Stewart says Friday night a group of young people rushed inside her home and beat her up.Her husband ran to help. In the meantime, her 2-year-old niece suffered a busted lip.Stewart ended up with bruises and a black eye.“I just felt like my house was in danger and my life was in danger. I felt like I was gonna be killed or someone in my house was gonna be killed. I had a little gir...More >>
    A Lee County woman says she'll think twice before opening her front door after a frightening home invasion.Tonya Stewart says Friday night a group of young people rushed inside her home and beat her up.Her husband ran to help. In the meantime, her 2-year-old niece suffered a busted lip.Stewart ended up with bruises and a black eye.“I just felt like my house was in danger and my life was in danger. I felt like I was gonna be killed or someone in my house was gonna be killed. I had a little gir...More >>
  • Football coaches stress hydration as South Georgia heats up

    Football coaches stress hydration as South Georgia heats up

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:12 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:12:23 GMT
    Football is an intense, and grueling collision sport, and when South Georgia heats up, practice is even more stressful on the body."We don't wanna lose a kid because of the fact they are not hydrating themselves," says Monroe Head Coach Charles Truitt.That's why coaches stress the importance of staying hydrated on and off the field."We preach when they get home at night after football practice, to hydrate themselves and then we they get up in the morning hydrate themselves," says Truitt.After...More >>
    Football is an intense, and grueling collision sport, and when South Georgia heats up, practice is even more stressful on the body."We don't wanna lose a kid because of the fact they are not hydrating themselves," says Monroe Head Coach Charles Truitt.That's why coaches stress the importance of staying hydrated on and off the field."We preach when they get home at night after football practice, to hydrate themselves and then we they get up in the morning hydrate themselves," says Truitt.After...More >>

June 6, 2005

Clinch County - Adair Chambers Peterson is about halfway through harvest season, and so far, things have been even better than expected. "I've been happy with it, things have gone well overall," said Peterson.

Her early variety blueberries got just enough rain and sunshine to make a sweet, plump fruit. But now its time to start picking the late varieties, and all the rain we've seen lately is bringing work to a stand-still. "You can't pick wet fruit and pack it to sell as fresh so when it rains, you have to wait for it to dry and about the time it dries, it rains again," said Peterson.

The rain delay may affect the quantity of this year's crop, but the quality is looking better than it has in years. Peterson is getting around $2.00 a pound for her blueberries at the market, which is twice as much as she was getting at this time last year. "There was a huge amount of fruit that hit the market at the same time and in order to move that fruit, we had to reduce prices," said Peterson.

But this year, the cold weather pushed harvesting back a few weeks. "By the time there was fruit available, the marketplace was ready for a lot of it," said Peterson.

Which means they were willing to pay a little bit more for it. Unfortunately, that means we have to pay more too. If you're buying blueberries at the grocery store, you may notice a higher price. That's because they're being hand picked right now, but when farmers bring their machine harvesters into the fields, that price will likely drop.

"As the volume of fruit increases, people start to mechanically harvest, we pack in bigger boxes and sell three times as much fruit for the same amount of money," said Peterson.

So while it will cost us a little more for the time-being, the above average quality of this years blueberries may be worth the extra penny.

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