Summer jobs for Fall tuition - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Summer jobs for Fall tuition

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  • Worth Co. hosts open house

    Worth Co. hosts open house

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:24 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:24:37 GMT
    It's already back to school time for some south Georgia students. Classes start tomorrow in Worth County.On Monday afternoon, all the schools held open houses for parents and students.At Worth County elementary, families got to met the teachers and get acquainted with the school.The Principal says the staff is ready, and parents told us they appreciated the open house."We are just going to keep going strong with things that we have done in the past, we had a very successful school year last y...More >>
    It's already back to school time for some south Georgia students. Classes start tomorrow in Worth County.On Monday afternoon, all the schools held open houses for parents and students.At Worth County elementary, families got to met the teachers and get acquainted with the school.The Principal says the staff is ready, and parents told us they appreciated the open house."We are just going to keep going strong with things that we have done in the past, we had a very successful school year last y...More >>
  • Lee Co. Woman speaks out about scary home invasion

    Lee Co. Woman speaks out about scary home invasion

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:20 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:20:11 GMT
    A Lee County woman says she'll think twice before opening her front door after a frightening home invasion.Tonya Stewart says Friday night a group of young people rushed inside her home and beat her up.Her husband ran to help. In the meantime, her 2-year-old niece suffered a busted lip.Stewart ended up with bruises and a black eye.“I just felt like my house was in danger and my life was in danger. I felt like I was gonna be killed or someone in my house was gonna be killed. I had a little gir...More >>
    A Lee County woman says she'll think twice before opening her front door after a frightening home invasion.Tonya Stewart says Friday night a group of young people rushed inside her home and beat her up.Her husband ran to help. In the meantime, her 2-year-old niece suffered a busted lip.Stewart ended up with bruises and a black eye.“I just felt like my house was in danger and my life was in danger. I felt like I was gonna be killed or someone in my house was gonna be killed. I had a little gir...More >>
  • Football coaches stress hydration as South Georgia heats up

    Football coaches stress hydration as South Georgia heats up

    Monday, July 28 2014 11:12 PM EDT2014-07-29 03:12:23 GMT
    Football is an intense, and grueling collision sport, and when South Georgia heats up, practice is even more stressful on the body."We don't wanna lose a kid because of the fact they are not hydrating themselves," says Monroe Head Coach Charles Truitt.That's why coaches stress the importance of staying hydrated on and off the field."We preach when they get home at night after football practice, to hydrate themselves and then we they get up in the morning hydrate themselves," says Truitt.After...More >>
    Football is an intense, and grueling collision sport, and when South Georgia heats up, practice is even more stressful on the body."We don't wanna lose a kid because of the fact they are not hydrating themselves," says Monroe Head Coach Charles Truitt.That's why coaches stress the importance of staying hydrated on and off the field."We preach when they get home at night after football practice, to hydrate themselves and then we they get up in the morning hydrate themselves," says Truitt.After...More >>

May 23, 2005

Albany- According to one study, tuition at public universities rose about 11 percent this year, making it even harder for some to afford college costs. Some teens are using the summer to invest in their futures.

19 year old Hajar Lateef is busy planning for her future. "Yeah, it does get quite busy around rush hour," says Lateef about her job. With her job at the Albany YMCA, she's funding her college career. She has big dreams of being a malpractice lawyer.

"Because that's where the money is, that's where the money is," says Lateef. Teenagers' views towards money are changing. Summer jobs are giving teens a different reason for working. "I love being a working woman because I'm helping myself with school and my family at the same time so it's pretty good to be a working woman," says Lateef.

According to a Junior Achievement Teen Summer Job Poll, the number one motivation for teens getting a job during the summer months is to save for college. About 33 percent of teens polled will be working this summer to help with tuition costs.

"I probably work about six days out of the week," says college student Robbie Matthew. To help with his college costs at Georgia Southern, Robbie Matthew will spend his summer days checking the waters at the YMCA.

"It makes it easier on my Mom and Dad. It makes it so they don't have to work quite as hard just to get me and both my sisters through college and high school," says Matthew. More teens are willing to use the majority of their summer days and summer money to help out.

"A lot of my funds that I make over the summer, I'll probably save about three quarters of it and put that towards rent payment and food bills," says Matthew. He feels that using a few months of hard work is an investment.

"This job prepared me for any job I'll have in the future because it teaches you a little bit more about responsibility and it's an easy way to ease teens and college students into the working world," says Matthew.

It's an investment that has some teens looking forward to a fulfilling reward. "Being that I'm able to help myself in school and my family but then at the same time be around decent people, it's like a pot of gold really," says Lateef.

In previous years, the number one reason kids gave for getting a summer job was extra spending money. That reason is number two this year. More than one thousand students participated in that national poll. 79 percent said they'll be working this summer.

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