Cuts in ag education could hurt learning experience, resources - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Cuts in ag education could hurt learning experience, resources

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • UPDATE: Police search for man who shot up two vehicles

    UPDATE: Police search for man who shot up two vehicles

    Sunday, July 27 2014 11:38 PM EDT2014-07-28 03:38:04 GMT
    Albany police say several shots were fired into an unoccupied vehicle Sunday evening at a restaurant parking lot.More >>
    Albany police say several shots were fired into an unoccupied vehicle Sunday evening at a restaurant parking lot.More >>
  • Westtown Library new hours start Monday

    Westtown Library new hours start Monday

    Sunday, July 27 2014 5:48 PM EDT2014-07-27 21:48:30 GMT
    An Albany library that reopened earlier this year due to budget cuts will start its new extended hours Monday morning.More >>
    An Albany library that reopened earlier this year due to budget cuts will start its new extended hours Monday morning.More >>
  • How to beat the heat

    How to beat the heat

    Sunday, July 27 2014 5:43 PM EDT2014-07-27 21:43:30 GMT
    Michelle DoyleMichelle Doyle
    If you’re out and about today make sure you stay hydrated. Temperatures will feel much warmer than they really are. It's the hottest day of summer and South Georgians are beating the heat by staying cool at Turtle Park. More >>
    If you’re out and about today make sure you stay hydrated. Temperatures will feel much warmer than they really are. It's the hottest day of summer and South Georgians are beating the heat by staying cool at Turtle Park. More >>

October 13, 2004

Worth County- It may soon get a lot harder for high school agricultural education students to get the hands on experience they need.

Worth, Lee and Turner high school students are getting these hogs ready to show at the Georgia National Fair this week.

But projects like this could disappear after State School Superintendent Kathy Cox cuts $2 million dollars for agricultural education statewide. Those cuts include money that pays for support staff.

"What happens then is that it trickles down to the classroom and we won't be getting the resources that we need as teachers to educate the students who are in our classes," said Donald Gilman, the ag education teacher at Worth County Middle School.

Gilman also says that research from the University of Georgia shows agriculture students are scoring higher on science portions of standardized tests.

People concerned about cuts in agricultural education should contact their state representative, state senator or the Department of Education.

posted at 4:45 p.m. by brannon.stewart@walb.com