Whooping cranes stop in South Georgia - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Whooping cranes stop in South Georgia

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Major road project takes a step forward

    Major road project takes a step forward

    Wednesday, April 23 2014 12:02 AM EDT2014-04-23 04:02:45 GMT
    Lee County Commissioners are close to approving a route for a major road project that will connect the east and west parts of the county. Tuesday night, they heard from Georgia Tech engineers who studiedMore >>
    Lee County residents will soon have the chance to give their opinions on a major road project.More >>
  • City leaders approve new rules for model airplanes

    City leaders approve new rules for model airplanes

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:59 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:59:14 GMT
    Albany city commissioners approve new rules for model airplanes.      Following complaints from some people who live near Hilsman Park a citizen's advisory committee spent months studying the issue andMore >>
    Albany city commissioners approve new rules for model airplanes.      Following complaints from some people who live near Hilsman Park a citizen's advisory committee spent months studying the issue andMore >>
  • Voters hear from candidates at forum

    Voters hear from candidates at forum

    Tuesday, April 22 2014 11:56 PM EDT2014-04-23 03:56:54 GMT
    Voters heard from more than a dozen political candidates at a forum Tuesday night hosted by the Albany Civil Rights Institute. People running in Dougherty County Commission, Dougherty County School BoardMore >>
    Days before early voting opens, candidates for several races in Dougherty County get together to try earn voters' support.More >>

December 1, 2003
Terrell County- These whooping cranes have taken off from places across the country for the past 40 days.

This flock is part of Operation Migration .

"What the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership is trying to do is re-establish a flock of whooping cranes in eastern North America," said Joe Duff, co-founder of Operation Migration.

The birds are raised in isolation and eventually introduced to the wild through this migratory flight. But while they're growing up, they never see a human.

"We wear a big baggy costume that covers our entire body, covers your hands, everything," Duff said. "We look through a visor that's tinted, so they can't see our faces."

"Now a whooping crane is about five and a half feet tall. So you don't want that bird accustomed to humans. They'll be in your backyard looking for handouts and that's not the kind of bird you want there."

The birds follow ultra-light planes on their trip south. On traveling days, they usually get about two to three hours of flying time. On a good day, they fly about 100 miles.

Monday was a really, really good day.

"Today we had a terrific tail wind, so even though the birds were flying at 38 miles per hour, we we're crossing the ground at about 80 miles per hour. It's kind of like paddling downstream. So we managed to do almost 200 miles today."

So they set a record when they landed in South Georgia. They're staying in an undisclosed location until they take off Tuesday. That is if the whether cooperates and if the birds are ready fly.

The birds final destination is in Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge in Citrus County, Florida.

posted at 10:27 p.m. by brannon.stewart@walb.com

Powered by WorldNow