Seafood prices on the rise - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Seafood prices on the rise

By Jade Bulecza - bio | email

VALDOSTA, GA (WALB) –Not surprisingly, seafood prices are on the way up.

The biggest jump is in oysters. One Valdosta fish market is having to charge customers $10  more per bushel.

And a restaurant is hoping they won't have to pass costs on to customers.

Ice is poured on top of a fish shipment the Oyster Bar Fish Market got in Monday. Dixon Goff says fish prices are staying relatively the same but oysters are a different story.

"Florida oystermen see they're the only show on the road and they've jacked their prices up," said Goff.

He says right now they're having to charge customers $45 a bushel rather than the $35  they normally charge.

If the oil comes into the Apalachicola Bay and oysters become scare, Goff says they may turn to the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia for oysters.

"It's just not what our people are used to," said Goff.

But as for now,

"Our regular customers seem to be eating them a little bit more because they want to make sure they get their oysters before it creeps into Florida," said Goff.

The Steamhouse Seafood restaurant's biggest concern is also the oysters.

Steamhouse Seafood gets their preshucked oysters from Texas and Louisiana but since many of the oysterhouses have closed, they're paying more.

They're now paying close to $60 a gallon for preshucked oysters, they use to fry, when they typically pay $33 dollars. They're also paying more for oysters they get in the Apalachicola bay.

For now, they can continue to sell these oysters at the same price to customers.

"We're willing to pay that extra price so that customers can still get good food at a great price," said David Brentise, the Steamhouse Seafood manager.

Friday June 25, Steamhouse sold 300 pounds of oysters. He says they get at least 10 calls a day for oysters.

Dixon Goff says the people who were depending on Louisiana and Alabama seafood have started buying Florida seafood that's what making oysters so scarce.

 
©2010 WALB News. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.  Feedback

 

 

  • More WALB News10 HeadlinesMore News HeadlinesMore>>

  • Pelham street signs will soon go up to honor State Championship team

    Pelham street signs will soon go up to honor State Championship team

    Thursday, March 30 2017 11:03 AM EDT2017-03-30 15:03:00 GMT
    (Source:WALB)(Source:WALB)

    The votes are in and Pelham has officially revealed it's new street signs honoring the girl's basketball state championship teams. The city polled community members on it's facebook page with two different designs.

    More >>

    The votes are in and Pelham has officially revealed it's new street signs honoring the girl's basketball state championship teams. The city polled community members on it's facebook page with two different designs.

    More >>
  • Sumter Co. Fire Dept. fights blaze at home

    Sumter Co. Fire Dept. fights blaze at home

    Thursday, March 30 2017 10:50 AM EDT2017-03-30 14:50:21 GMT
    (Source: WALB)(Source: WALB)

    Sumter County Fire & Rescue is on scene of a house fire off Highway 280 East. 

    More >>

    Sumter County Fire & Rescue is on scene of a house fire off Highway 280 East. 

    More >>
  • Making Marines: A full day at Parris Island

    Making Marines: A full day at Parris Island

    Thursday, March 30 2017 7:57 AM EDT2017-03-30 11:57:58 GMT
    (Source: WALB)(Source: WALB)

    WALB's Re-Essa Buckels got her first full day of Marine Recruit Depot bootcamp at Parris Island, South Carolina. Buckels was invited to attend Marine Corps Educator's Workshop to study how Marines are made. A Marine says "You have just taken the first step at becoming a member of the world's finest fighting force." Sixty educators, some from Jacksonville, some from Baton Rouge lined up on the legendary yellow footprints; the first place all recruits stop, be...

    More >>

    WALB's Re-Essa Buckels got her first full day of Marine Recruit Depot bootcamp at Parris Island, South Carolina to study how Marines are made. Sixty educators, some from Jacksonville, some from Baton Rouge, lined up on the legendary yellow footprints; the first place all recruits stop.

    More >>
Powered by Frankly