Studies say public smoking bans reduce heart attacks - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Studies say public smoking bans reduce heart attacks

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By Jim Wallace - bio | email

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - New studies suggest that banning cigarette smoking in most public buildings has lowered certain health risks.

The city of Albany was one of the first in the Southeast to implement a clean air ordinance, back in 1998. It required separately ventilated smoking areas in most restaurants, workplaces, and indoor public places. Now two studies by the American Heart Association say that the number of heart attacks fell by as much as 36% after three years of public smoking bans.

David Cooper, the Health Promotions Coordinator with the Health Department says "It's an inexpensive way to reduce healthcare costs. By smoking bans. Because the risk of heart disease, lung cancer, and other types of cancer."

The co-author of one of the studies says it adds to already strong evidence that secondhand cigarette smoke causes heart attacks.

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