Raising awareness about Lyme disease - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Raising awareness about lyme disease

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By Wainwright Jeffers - bio | email

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - Area doctors are trying to spread the word about a disease that could be lurking under your skin.

Thursday night the Dougherty County Medical Society showed a film called "Under Your Skin" that documents stories of people whose lives have been affected by lyme disease.

You get the illness from ticks, but cases are often misdiagnosed or undetected.

"It starts off as a rash right where you got the tick bite sometimes it's so subtle that it's missed beyond that people are going to get joint pains then it could go on and cause cardiac issues neurological issues," said Dr. Melinda Greenfield, Dermatologist.

In 2008, there were nearly 29,000 cases in the US and the CDC estimates, because the disease is so hard to diagnose and the tests are so unreliable, the true number of cases are anywhere from 6 to 12% higher than reported cases. 

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