Livestock will benefit from steady rain - WALB.com, Albany News, Weather, Sports

Livestock will benefit from steady rain

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By Jay Polk - bio | email

ALBANY, GA (WALB) - The recent rain followed by dry weather have been good the hay crop here in South Georgia.  

Grasses that are cultivated as hay are growing quickly thanks to all the rain,  but they need several days of dry weather to be cultivated. That's because after the grasses are cut, they're left in the field and then gone over again before being gathered.

If the hay is too moist, mold can build up, and that can be deadly for some animals. Since the first cut is left in the field, hay farmers depend on an accurate forecast.  

"We're better off to get a rain the day we cut than the day before we bale. It does less damage to the hay," said Scott Price of Nonami Plantation.

Price says the rain put them about two weeks behind schedule, and that could end up costing them one harvest.

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