Home & Family: Parenting, Education, Seniors + Green tips & help - WALB.com, South Georgia News, Weather, Sports

Tips for avoiding back-to-school germs, illnesses

Kids and germs seem to go together like peanut butter and jelly. But, there are ways that parents can help protect their kids from the usual barrage of back-to-school illnesses, a health expert says.

More>>

Child abuse cases in army families may be under-reported

Pixland / Thinkstock Pixland / Thinkstock

Child abuse within U.S. Army families may be significantly under-reported, a new study suggests.

More>>

Vegetarian diets called good for people and the planet

Vegetarian diets are healthy for people of all ages, as well as the environment, according to a new update of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' (AND) position on vegetarian diets.

More>>

'Enthusiastic' dads may mean less troubled kids

While quality time spent with kids is always important, new research suggests it's a man's attitude that's key to raising happy children.

More>>

Even people who can afford to buy their homes increasingly prefer to rent

“Rent, don’t buy,” may be the new mantra among higher-income Americans.

More>>

How to introduce your baby to food containing peanuts

For parents who are unsure when and how to introduce their babies to food containing peanuts, new guidelines are on the way.

More>>

Got a moody teen? Lack of sleep may not be the culprit

It's not a lack of sleep that makes many teens cranky, ill-mannered and muddled during the day, a new study contends.

More>>

Scented rooms, products? Many health-conscious Americans say 'no thanks'

Lavender, lemon or lilac: Whatever the artificial aroma, more Americans are avoiding scented spaces and products, a new survey shows.

More>>

How an online interior designer made my apartment look magazine-worthy

When I moved out of my shared two-bedroom apartment to embrace life sans roommates, I called it adulthood. What I didn’t anticipate was also calling it claustrophobia.

More>>

Pediatricians: Kids need 'media use plan' from parents

Children and teenagers are immersed in an environment saturated with electronic media, ranging from the TV on the wall to the tablet or smartphone in their hands.

More>>

Cost keeps many kids from school sports, other activities

High costs are a major reason why many poor students don't take part in school sports, clubs or arts programs, a new survey finds.

More>>

National school lunch program serving up healthier fare

U.S. school lunch guidelines introduced a few years ago are improving students' eating habits, a new study suggests.

More>>

Expecting twins or triplets? What you should know before they arrive

The number of U.S. couples expecting twins or even triplets is on the rise, and these parents will have their hands full.

More>>

Your biological clock: Why some age faster than others

Some adults age faster biologically than others, and may die early even if they have healthy lifestyles, researchers report.

More>>

Pre-K program helps low-income kids succeed in school

A pre-kindergarten program designed to help low-income minority children develop social and other skills appears to boost school performance, a new study shows.

More>>

Not all dogs are man's (or kids') best friend

Young kids don't necessarily know they shouldn't approach a scared dog, which could put them in danger of being bitten, a new British study shows.

More>>

Smart city planning can cut deadly diseases, improve air quality

Cities that promote walking, bicycling and public transportation can expect a drop in chronic illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes, a new study suggests.

More>>

Close bond between kids, parents has long-term health benefits

A strong and loving bond with parents may help protect kids' health for decades, a new study suggests.

More>>

Do open floor plans invite overeating?

Open-concept living spaces are all the rage right now, but new research suggests that such easy access to the kitchen may lead to overeating.

More>>

For kids playing Pokemon Go, catch these safety tips

It seems as if every kid in America is caught up in the Pokemon Go craze. But in the quest to "catch 'em all," don't leave common sense and safety behind, the American Academy of Pediatrics urges.

More>>

Seniors not scared of social media after all

The notion that seniors shy away from social media may be off the mark.

More>>

Coping with college stress

Stress and anxiety are common among new college students, but there are ways to cope, a doctor says.

More>>

Parents can play key role in setting healthy habits for kids

Encouraging your kids to eat right, exercise and limit screen time may not be enough to instill healthy habits. You also need to lead by example, researchers suggest.

More>>

Over 64? Want to cut your heart disease risk? Try exercise

Ride a bike, take a swim, walk your dog: New research shows even a "moderate" amount of exercise each week drastically reduces the odds a person aged 65 or older will die from heart disease.

More>>

Sleep is key to college success

It can be hard for college students to get enough sleep, and that can affect their physical and mental well-being, a sleep expert says.

More>>

Early to bed, early to rise a back-to-school challenge

It's time to start getting children and teens into their school-year sleep routine, an expert says.

More>>

Surviving freshman year 101

College freshmen face many new experiences and academic demands, but there are a number ways to ease into campus life.

More>>

Sending kids off to college doesn't have to be tearful

As new college students prepare to leave home, it can be a difficult time for parents.

More>>

Babies often put to sleep in unsafe positions

Despite decades of warnings from the "Back to Sleep" campaign, many parents are still putting their babies to sleep in ways that raise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), a new study finds.

More>>

Heat waves hit seniors hardest

As much of the Northeast struggles with a heat wave that isn't expected to ease until the middle of this week, here are some expert tips on how to spot heat stroke.

More>>

The safest way to get to school is a big yellow bus

School buses are the safest way for students to get to and from school, according to the National Safety Council.

More>>

Stressed dads can affect kids' development

When dads are stressed out about parenting, it may take a toll on their toddlers' development, a new study suggests.

More>>

Summer days shouldn't be lazy for kids

Kids love the unstructured days of summer, but parents need to be sure children get moving during their summer holidays, a physical education expert says.

More>>

Hovering parents may harm kids

Children with "intrusive" parents who push too hard for good grades may be more prone to become highly self-critical or anxious and depressed, a new study suggests.

More>>

Family key to helping teens avoid obesity

Having a stable family and a good relationship with mom and dad makes young people more likely to develop healthy habits that may protect them against obesity, a new study suggests.

More>>

Savvy marketing gets school kids to snap up veggies

While clever marketing can steer kids towards junk food, a new study shows that creative advertising can also prompt more kids to eat veggies.

More>>

Those baby 'milestones' may have longer-term importance

Babies who learn to stand up relatively early may also do a bit better with attention, memory and learning by the time they are preschoolers, a new study suggests.

More>>

Americans living longer and better

Americans aren't just living longer, they're living more years without disabilities, too, a new study shows.

More>>

Kids' grades may suffer when families move

Moving to a new home may harm young children's school performance, a study suggests.

More>>

Growth spurts can throw off teen boys' strut

Growth spurts can affect teen boys' coordination and knock the swagger right out of their stride, a new study reveals.

More>>

Frat brothers keep chugging despite anti-booze efforts

The boys of "Animal House" and "Neighbors" may be immune to anti-boozing programs that curb drinking for other college kids, new research suggests.

More>>

Calling your kid 'fat' could be counterproductive

Two studies highlight the complex relationship between parents' perceptions and their children's weights.

More>>

8 summer health myths debunked

Thanks to the excessive heat and lots of outdoor activities, the summer lends itself to plenty of claims about health and safety. However, many of these adages simply aren't true.

More>>

Late dinners won't doom kids to obesity

Late suppers may not be a recipe for childhood obesity, a new study shows.

More>>

What really works to help baby sleep

Common techniques for helping babies -- and parents -- sleep at night seem to carry no long-term harms, a small trial finds.

More>>

Too few Americans take advantage of local parks

Most neighborhood parks in the United States are geared toward younger people, which limits their use, a new study suggests.

More>>

When new moms work longer hours, breast-feeding takes a back seat

Every working mom knows how hard it can be to juggle the demands of her job with the needs of her new baby, particularly when it comes to breast-feeding.

More>>

What works -- and doesn't -- to manage your tot's screen time

As any parent of a preschooler knows, media management can be a minefield of do's, don'ts -- and tantrums.

More>>

Climate change may mean more smoggy days to come

Climate change could cause many major American cities to experience more days with heavy ozone pollution in the coming decades, a new study predicts.

More>>

More kids being poisoned by detergent pods

A growing number of small children are getting their hands and mouths on colorful detergent pods, with serious and sometimes fatal consequences, a new study finds.

More>>

Retirement can be golden for your health

Although aging may mean more physical problems, retirement can help people lead healthier lives, a new study from Australia suggests.

More>>

Let safety bloom in your garden this season

Gardening offers exercise and fresh food, but don't forget to protect yourself from potential hazards, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says.

More>>

Nagging your kids about weight might backfire

When parents believe their children are overweight -- regardless of whether they are or not -- those kids are likely to gain weight, a new study suggests.

More>>

Americans' longer life = poorer health

Americans are living longer, but those extra years may include poor health or a disability, a new study finds.

More>>

Schools in most states skimp on phys ed

Most states don't provide students with enough physical education, a new report finds.

More>>

Intensive exercise a fountain of youth for aging muscles

One key to keeping muscles young is as close as the nearest gym, researchers say.

More>>

What it really takes to win over a picky eater

How a produce-loving parent confronts her kid's vegetables anxieties head-on

More>>

Breakfast in school classrooms expands participation, not waistlines

The number of New York City kids eating free breakfasts in public school classrooms is growing, but the obesity rates are not, a new study finds.

More>>

More U.S. women delivering babies at home or birth centers

More women in the United States are choosing to deliver their babies at home or in birth centers, a new study indicates.

More>>

School breakfast programs vital, even if some kids also eat at home

Students who eat two breakfasts are less likely to become overweight or obese than those who skip the morning meal, according to a new study.

More>>

Good sleep habits ready kids for school success

Children who have good sleep habits by age 5 do better at school, a new study finds.

More>>

How to purchase a home in a competitive market

8 ways to prepare yourself and your finances for buying a home this spring

More>>

Even gardening or dancing might cut Alzheimer's risk

Regular physical activity, including gardening or dancing, may cut Alzheimer's risk by as much as 50 percent, a new study suggests.

More>>

Head lice no cause for panic

Most parents have at one time or another received the dreaded school notice: a case of head lice has been detected in your child's class.

More>>

Tablets often used to pacify difficult kids

Some parents use mobile phones and tablets to calm young children with behavioral problems, a new study finds.

More>>

Fidgeting may help students with ADHD learn

Students who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often get into trouble for fidgeting in the classroom, but that fidgeting may help them learn, new research suggests.

More>>

Exercise + classwork may = better math scores

Schoolchildren may have an easier time learning if exercise is part of their math and spelling lessons, a new study suggests.

More>>

Could adults' expectations drive up ADHD diagnoses in kids?

Rates of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have risen globally, and adults' unreasonable expectations of young children could be one reason why, researchers suggest.

More>>

Uncorrected eye problem linked to learning issues for preschoolers

Preschool children with uncorrected farsightedness are at risk for literacy problems, new research suggests.

More>>

Study ties parents' criticism to persistent ADHD in kids

Constant criticism from parents reduces the likelihood that children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) will have fewer symptoms by the time they reach their teens, a new study suggests.

More>>

Googling for a locksmith may not be the best idea

If you need a locksmith, you may want to call a friend for a recommendation instead of using Google to find a qualified service. 

More>>

Texting after dark may harm teens' sleep, grades

Instant messaging can be a source of emotional support for teens and help them collaborate on school projects, but new research shows that texting after the lights go out takes a toll on students' sleep quality and academic performance.

More>>

*DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
Powered by Frankly